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St Paul the Apostle spent three months on the island of Mljet in Croatia

Saint Paul had shipwreck on Croatian island of Mljet, and not on Malta. This is the subject of the monumental book written in elite Latin language by Ignjat Đurđević, published in Venice in 1730. Ignjat Đurđevic was Croatian Baroque writer from the city of Dubrovnik. The island of Mljet is not far from Dubrovnik.

Until recently it was believed that the first person to identify the location of Saint Paul's shipwreck near Mljet was the father of European historigraphy, the Greek emperor and historian Constanine Porphyrogenitus (905-959) who, describing the south Dalmatian islands in his work "On Administering the Empire", wrote the following:

Another big island is Mljet. It was described by Saint Luke in the Acts where he calls it Melita. Saint Paul was there bitten by the viper but he shook it off into the fire where it was burned.

However, scholars have recently discovered new information in The Geography of distinguished Armenian scholar Ananias of Shirak, written between 592-636 AD, which confirms that Saint Paul stayed in Dalmatia following a shipwreck that happened on the Adriatic island of Melita (Mljet).


The bendictine Abbey of Sv. Marija (St Mary) on an islet on Veliko jezero (Great Lake) near the island of Mljet. Photo by Nikola Piasevoli.

After Porphyrogenitus, the 16th century Italian historian of Dubrovnik (Ragusa) Serafino Razzi, Dominican and for a while Vicar of Capitular of the Ragusan Metropolitan see, claimed the same. He set forth the following:

At the end of this presentation on the island of Mljet, I shall tell you that many serious writers think that this Ragusan Mljet was the very island where Saint Paul the Apostle escaped after the shipwreck and there he was bitten by a viper as written in chapter 28 of the Acts. One of them is the honorable cardinal Gaetano.

Razzi thought that the shipwreck couldn not have taken place in Malta because Malta was situated in the African, instead of in the Adriatic Sea.

Đurđević claimed at the beginning of his book the following

I say and I claim that before the chivalrous Hospitaller Order of St John moved to African Melita, the glory of Saint Paul's shipwreck site had been granted, without any hesitation or doubt, to Illyrian Melita.

It is interesting that while Malta was under the Spanish government, Đurđević was supported in his views by both English and French scholars. However, when Malta came under the English protectorate, the circumstances changed and the English writers stood up for the Maltese option. Something similar happened to the French writers when Malta was conquered by Napolen Bonaparte.

The following important scholarly book dealing with the shipwreck of St Paul on the Adriatic island of Mljet has been published in 2015:



Zlatko Pavetić (ed): The Journey of Paul the Apostle to Rome led over the Croatian Island of Mljet (Melita) / Put apostola Pavla za Rim vodio je preko hrvatskog otoka Mljeta (Melite), Proceedings of the academic conference held on Mljet (Melita) 15 October 2011 / Zbornik radova znanstvenog skupa odr\anog na Mljetu (Meliti) 15. listopada 2011., Zagreb, 2015., ISBN 978-953-58133-0-9, 356 pp, in English and Croatian, hard cover, with color photos and maps


Selected articles from the Proceedings:

Dr Miho Demović: PREFACE

Dr Miho Demović: TWO MILLENIA OF DUBROVNIK TRADITION OF SAINT PAUL'S SHIPWRECK IN THE WATERS OF CROATIAN ISLAND OF MLJET, Conclusion and Summary

Dr Miho Demović: FOLLOWING HIS SHIPWRECK, ST PAUL THE APOSTLE SAILED TO ROME ON AN ALEXANDRIAN SHIP FROM THE ANCIENT HARBOUR OF POLAČE ON MLJET IN THE YEAR 61 A. D.

Dr Miho Demović: THREE FAMOUS SHIPWRECK SURVIVORS FROM DUBROVNIK




The spine of the book represents the Mljet viper. It is probably the unique such book in the world.




Nikola Tesla distinugished Croatian-American scientist and inventor
and his high-school education in Croatia


Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) in his laboratory in Colorad Springs in 1899,
with the book  Ruđer Bošković, a famous Croatian scientist.

Nikola Tesla

Martin Sekulić (1833-1905), professor of mathematics and Physics in Rakovica (Karlovca),
in Croatia, in the High Real School which Nikola Tesla attended in the years 1870-1873.
Sekulić is probably the most important professor during entire schooling of Nikola Tesla.
His experiments enthused young Tesla for electricity and magnetism.
He was a member of the Academy of Sciences in Zagreb (in the division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics).


The working language in the High Real School (Obere Realschule) in Rakovica was German.
Rakovica was then a part of the Croatian Miliatry Frontier,
 i.e., (according to the then terminology) of  Kroatischen Militär-Grenze, or Hrvatska krajina, or Hrvatska Vojna krajina.
Later, the name of Hrvatsko-slavonska Vojna krajina was also used.

Some of the subjects that young Nikola Tesla listened to as a student of the VI'th grade of the (roughly, age of 16).
The source is  school yearbook of the Rakovac High Real School for the period of  1872-1874.

Kroatische Sprache - Croatian language

Mathematics

Physics

These subjects had been described not only in German, but in Croatian langauge as well:


Hrvatski jezik - Croatian language

Mathematics

Physics

Here we stress that the Croatian Language was the mother tongue of Nikola Tesla. This fact is missing
in literally all biographical sources (including monographs) dealing with Nikola Tesla.
It is a well documented fact by available school yearbooks from the period of 1870-1873.

We conclude with the (duplicate of) matriculation form that Nikola Tesla earned in Rakovica in 1873:

The title page of the (duplicate of) Nikola Tesla's matriculation form, issued in Croatia's capital Zagreb in 1885..

As we can see (in the second last line), one of the subjects
Nikola Tesla's final exam was Croatian language.
Plese, see a more detiled information.




Selfportrait of young Julije Klović, 1498-1578, a famous Croatian minature painter,
kept in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. Text arround the upper border:

Iulius Clouius Croatus sui ipsius effigiator Ao:aetat: 30.salut: 1528.


Iulius Clouius Croatus
With sadness we have to point at the following mistake made by the Kunshistoriches museum in Vienna:

Iulius Clouius [sic!] sui ipsius effigiator Ao:aetat: 30.salut: 1528.

i.e., Croatus has been omitted on the web page of the Kunsthistorisches Museum.

The same mistake can be seen on europeana.eu, referring to Kunshitorisches Museum as the data provider:


Noticed on 21 Jan. 2013, see JPG_kunsthistorishecs_museum, JPG_europeana.eu

The mistake at Kunsthistorisches Museum has been corrected in March 2014,
but at
europeana.eu it is still not corrected (as of April 2014).
As of September 2014, europeana.eu changed its web page to the indicated address.
Also, europeana.eu changed its link from referring 
Kunshitorisches Museum (with corrected mistake)
to kulturpool.at, containing the same mistake.






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